National team aims for better placing

first_imgJamaica’s national dart team is looking forward to a stronger performance at this year’s Caribbean Championship that will be held in Barbados.The local body, Jamaica Dart Association (JDA), named a 13-member squad for the regional tournament to run from July 12-17.National player/coach Colin Chandia expects the team to finish better than the seventh place in last year’s competition.”We participated last year after a long layoff, where we finished seventh out of 12 teams. We have been working hard for the past three months in order to be better prepared,” Chandia told The Gleaner.”The main focus is to finish in a higher position. We should give a significant performance this year,” he emphasised.He is looking towards the senior players to inspire the team, which was selected from players participating in the ongoing local league.The full team is: Men – Albert Bailey (Portmore Contenders), Colin Chandia (Chelsea Precision), David Green (BOJ Gators), Dwight Smith (Chelsea Precision), Evon Faulkner (BOJ Gators), Lynford Jonas (Dynasty MoBay), Mark Birthwright (Central Miners) and Winston Ferguson (Portmore Stimulus).Women – Carol Cheese (Shooting Stars), Catherine Stewart (BOJ Gators), Jennifer Reid (MoBay Darters), Lorraine Nembhard (Portmore Contenders) and Marvel Brown (MoBay Darters).last_img read more

Sharks vs. Avalanche roundtable: Who will win Game 7?

first_imgIt’s time for Game 7, again.The Sharks will face off against the Colorado Avalanche Wednesday night in a winner-take-all game to head to the Western Conference final against the St. Louis Blues, who won a Game 7 of their own Tuesday night.We turned to our Sharks beat writer Curtis Pashelka and his Denver Post counterpart Mike Chambers to lend their expertise as we sort through the matchups and possibilities in Game 7.Question: If Joe Pavelski is able to return from his head injury, what …last_img read more

Using the Track Select Forward Tool in DaVinci Resolve 15

first_imgLearning a new application can mean spending hours stumped by usability issues. Here’s one we found in Resolve — and how to fix it.Every so often, we run across an issue that doesn’t have an apparent answer, partly because we’re not too sure what’s causing the problem. There’s one issue in Resolve that, when I was new to the platform, boggled me for hours, and that’s selecting multiple clips at once from the playheads position using the track select forward shortcut.If familiar with Premiere Pro, you’re likely familiar with this button:It’s the handy Track Select Tool, which allows you to move the contents of an entire track forward from the position of the playhead. You can also move multiple tracks by holding shift and selecting a different track. It’s an efficient way of moving multiple clips on numerous tracks forward or backward, without selecting all clips. As is the case in Resolve, if we were to select all clips (Ctrl+A) in the image below, we would be unable to move the clips back because track one already has clips that reach the start of the timeline, which acts as a wall.However, if we were to track-select Video 2 and Audio 1 and 2, we could then move all clips back to the desired position.We could, in theory, also hold shift and highlight the desired clips across the tracks to move them backward or forward. However, if you have a long timeline with multiple clips, that’s a recipe for disaster. I could happily sing the praises of Resolve’s user interface and design mechanics all day long. It’s very user-friendly, but every so often, I do run into a feature that could perform better. Selecting clips forward and backward is the heel today.In Resolve, we don’t exactly have a tool icon to select, nor is it available using the trim tool, but you can perform the operation by using a keyboard shortcut — which is Y or Ctrl+Y to select all clips back from the playhead position. However, as you can see in the GIF below, look what happens when I hit Y and Ctrl+Y after selecting the track region I want to move forward:The clips on the track above become selected, and the clips on track one, the track I selected, have been omitted from the process. This is because the track above is currently the designated video track, meaning if I were to insert a clip from the source viewer, it would appear on the secondary track. We can see that it’s the destination track because of the orange square active on the track header. So, even though I have selected track one because it’s not the active destination track, the select clips forward function does not work the way I need it to. To move the clips forward for the first video track, which is confusingly also called V1, you have to change the destination track — which you can do so by selecting the V1 button.A secondary issue when using these shortcuts is when you want to move clips forward from all tracks, which you do by pressing Alt+Y, or Ctrl+ALT+Y to select all tracks backward from your position. One would think that as you’re selecting all the tracks, there wouldn’t be an issue with having a designated video track as you’re selecting multiple. Yet, as you can see below, when hitting Alt+Y, only the clips from the one video track are selected.Why is this? Well, unlike having an active video track destination, this is now a result of autoselect (if you are unfamiliar with autoselect, you can read about that feature here). In the example, you can see that I don’t have autoselect active on any of the tracks. Therefore, to track-select all tracks, I need to activate autoselect. At first, this seems like a hindrance. However, it was designed this way — if you need to select all tracks except two, you can omit those two tracks by deselecting autoselect.So, the tl;dr:To change the track that you want to use the track select tool on, you have to change the designated video or audio track.To select multiple tracks, you have to turn autoselect on. Lewis McGregor is a certified DaVinci Resolve Trainer.Looking for more articles on DaVinci Resolve? Check these out.DaVinci Resolve 15 Video Crash Course — The Edit ToolsDaVinci Resolve 15 Video Crash Course — The Edit PageDaVinci Resolve 15 Video Crash Course — The Media PageColor Grading: Working with the Hue vs. Curves in DaVinci ResolveRevive Your Footage With Resolve 15’s Automatic Dirt Repair and Dust Buster Toolslast_img read more

How to Be Intellectually Curious in Sales

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now If you want to develop your business acumen, your situational knowledge, and your ability to create value for your clients and your dream clients, you need to become intellectually curious. You have to seek to understand how things work, why people do things a certain way, why people want what they want, and when it makes sense to do something.When I was young and first started selling, I developed the practice of asking my clients questions. At first, the questions I asked were direct, and my goal was not to understand, but rather to elicit the client’s dissatisfaction. The word we used to describe “what is keeping the customer up at night,” assuming they knew what should be keeping them up at night and that they were willing to share it with a salesperson who might be able to help). Later, after I became a better salesperson from having studied Neil Rackham’s work, my questions switched to what his model called “implication” questions. I started asking the question, “What happens if you don’t do something different?”At some point, I realized that creating greater value for my clients meant learning more about their business. I started to ask a different set of questions designed to obtain a real understanding of how their business worked, how they thought about their business and the competitive landscape, and how I might be more helpful to them.One of my clients was responsible for an enormous logistics operations. In a meeting I attended, the attendees from his management team continuously talked about “throughput.” I knew what the word meant, and I had some understanding of how what I sold would impact their throughput, but I wasn’t certain. So I asked my client to explain it to me, and then to share with me how I might impact that metric in a meaningful way. And then I asked five more clients to give me their views on the same metric, and in doing so, I became more valuable to my clients and my dream clients.Ask HowIt is valuable to know how different business models work. If you want to create value for the teams that manage and run businesses, you need to know how things work. You want to understand their overall strategy as a business, something you can quickly learn to discern by reading The Discipline of Market Leaders by Michael Treacy and Fred Wiersema. You can also learn a good bit by simply watching or listening to CNBC, especially in the morning, when they interview CEOs and business leaders.To be intellectually curious, you have to want to know how things work. You can ask your client how they compete in their marketplace and what they believe differentiates them from their competitors. You can ask how they handle some process or execute something that provides you with a better understanding of what they think they need to do to be successful. You can even ask how they feel about some strategic or tactical decision they need to make for their business.In exploratory or discovery calls, the depth and breadth of what you discover—and what you help the client discover about themselves—is going to be based on the level of questions you ask. Asking “What’s keeping you up at night” might still be a useful question, and you will have clients who want to share the answer and acquire some help solving those problems. However, that question doesn’t demonstrate a real interest in their business, nor does it indicate you have a deep enough understanding to be considered a future partner.If you work selling to and serving businesses and the people that run them, you have to intellectually curious enough to understand business principles.Ask WhyFrom time to time, you will be baffled by some of the things your clients and prospects do in pursuing some result. Sometimes you will see them doing something that doesn’t seem to make sense, only to find out is working well for them, giving you new insight as to how you might do something different or better. Other time you will see your dream client doing something so wrong that it’s difficult to believe. What you want to know is “why” they do what they do.If you are going to be intellectually curious, you are going to have to ask why, without being judgmental. You will have clients who seem to be doing things in ways that make the outcome they need difficult for them, only to find out there is a good reason why they do things in a certain way. How you provide a solution that gains their commitment to work with you may very well depend on you knowing how to improve their results in a way that doesn’t disrupt something that needs to be done in a certain way.But asking why often reveals areas where an improvement is available to your client because they don’t know there are better ways available to them. If you believe that salespeople are no longer necessary because their clients and prospects can research on the internet, likely, you don’t work in sales. The intellectually curious salesperson has the benefit of learning from clients and prospects, coupled with the experience of working with clients to know more about the nuances around decisions and solutions that exceed anything one might learn from researching company websites.Taking care of your clients and prospects requires the curiosity to understand why certain things are done, sometimes this way, and other times another way. You need to know how to think about trade-offs, what this is better than that, and when it makes sense to do something.What They WantSuccess in sales in large part depends on effectively working with and for other people. Even though you are supposed to believe relationships no longer matter in sales, the truth of the matter is that matter more now than ever in a world being pulled in two directions (super-transactional and super-relational). It pays to be intellectually curious about what human beings want and why.Let me give you an easy, sales-related example. I once heard a purchasing manager explain that his compensation was, in part, based on price savings over prior years. He wasn’t interested in cost savings if those savings weren’t visible as a reduction in price, as he was not compensated on the difficult to capture, but very real soft costs.Some leaders invest in outcomes and will willingly pay more for things like speed to market, greater market share, innovative ideas that create a competitive advantage, or any number of things they want. If you’re going to be intellectually curious, you’ll ask them why they want what they want, why it’s important to them. There may not be anything more interesting or useful than understating human psychology and motivation, something worth learning to understand (as much as it can be).If you want to be better in sales, a better sales manager, or more effective leader, and an all-around more successful person, being intellectually curious is as good a place to start as any.last_img read more