70th birthday and charity hack raise €2,740 for Raphoe’s Riding for the Disabled

first_imgTwo fantastic fundraisers have gathered €2,740 for the Raphoe and East Donegal branch of Riding for the Disabled.Mr Graham Bell recently held his 70th birthday party in aid of the volunteer group. He and his guests gathered €2,040 to make a very generous donation to his chosen charity.The money was gratefully received following a presentation by Mr & Mrs Bell with Adeline Temple, Suzanne Carroll, Jacqueline Witherow and Isobel Roulston from Raphoe and East Donegal RDAI. Mr & Mrs Bell with Adeline Temple, Suzanne Carroll, Jacqueline Witherow and Isobel Roulston from Raphoe and East Donegal RDAIAlso in June, the Tir Conaill Riding Club hosted a charity ride-out at Lough Eske to raise €700 for the group. The members took part in a 16km trek across the Bluestack Mountains before Mr Noel Cunningham and Harvey’s Point Hotel provided a beautiful lunch afterwards. Raphoe and East Donegal RDAI are very grateful to all concerned for their kind contribution  and generous hospitality.Tir Conaill Riding clubRaphoe’s Riding for the Disabled is dedicated to improving the lives of people with disabilities through the provision of horse riding and carriage driving. 70th birthday and charity hack raise €2,740 for Raphoe’s Riding for the Disabled was last modified: July 9th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Raphoe and East Donegal branch of Riding for the Disabledlast_img read more

Fresh off Western Oregon win, Humboldt State looking to pick up first victory of 2016 at home

first_imgARCATA >> And now, the Jacks can settle in at home for the first time in weeks.No more worrying about any kind of road trip and hours upon hours in buses until the final week of the season. The Jacks’ stretch of four road games in the span of six weeks is officially a thing of the past.Humboldt State, now with two of its final three games remaining this season set to be played at the Redwood Bowl, looks to claim its first win at homet at 6 p.m. tonight when the Great Northwest Athletic …last_img read more

Color Grading Footage in After Effects with Lumetri

first_imgUnderstanding Lumetri ScopesIf you have never used scopes before, here is a quick breakdown of each scope.The Waveform MonitorWith a typical display of 0-100, the waveform measures your shot’s data and lays it out across the display. Information at 0 IRE (Institute of Radio Engineers) is black pixels, or clipped information. Data that peaks at 100 IRE is white, or blown-out information. Essentially, the waveform displays the exposure across your shot.A good rule of thumb when correcting for lighter skin tones is to keep the highlights around 70 IRE.The VectorscopeThe vectorscope measures chroma in the shot. It displays the red, yellow, green, cyan, blue, and magenta values. Depending on your shot, you’ll see the data favoring certain areas of the vector. For example, if your shot includes a grassy field, the data in the vectorscope will lean heavily toward the greens. When you saturate your image, the data will pull outwards to the edges of the scope.The ParadeThe parade is best for correcting multiple shots in the same sequence. The parade usually displays in RGB, which shows the dominance of each color. With the parade, you can easily balance the color in your shot and monitor how it matches up with the other shots in your scene.The HistogramSimilar to the waveform scope, the histogram displays your luma and RGB from 0 IRE to 100 IRE.Tips for Great Color CorrectionEven though you may be a motion graphics artist or a compositor, when you are color correcting and grading footage, you are a colorist. Your job as a colorist is to put the final touches on the story. Your grade needs to set the final mood and ensure that there are no distractions from shot to shot. Scopes make sure your video is good across all displays and that the end result is broadcast legal. There aren’t many wrong answers when it comes to grading. It’s important to create your style and make sure you deliver what the client wants.What’s your opinion on color correcting and grading footage in After Effects? Let us know in the comments. Learn how to color correct your video with the new Lumetri Scopes in After Effects.Cover image via Shutterstock.With the addition of Lumetri Scopes in After Effects, color correcting and grading footage is easier than ever for AE users. The update provides the four essential scopes: histogram, vectorscope, parade, and waveform. After Effects users can now accurately match light levels and color information in their shots. While DaVinci Resolve and even Adobe Premiere Pro are still the go-to options for correcting and grading, video producers who do compositing work can now keep a larger portion of their workflow in After Effects.Here’s what you’ll take away from our video tutorial:How to use Lumetri ScopesWhat multiple color correction filters can do for your footageUnderstanding how to color correct for skin tonesLet’s get started.last_img read more

From Río San Juan to San José A Nicaraguan refugee in Costa

From Río San Juan to San José A Nicaraguan refugee in Costa

first_imgHere is Part 2 of our interview with Nelson Jesus Zeas Paz. It has been translated from Spanish and edited for clarity and readability.The Tico Times: How did you get to Costa Rica? Nelson Jesús Zeas Paz: Walking. By mountains and forests, because I was already on the list. I wouldn’t be able to get on a bus because paramilitaries would be set up … checking to see who’s on the list, and they’d ask for my name, and I’d come up on the list of enemies of the state because I was a territory leader. I paid a coyote to help me because I didn’t know the area well and it was winter. We crossed the muddy roads through forests, bushes and over the mountains. At some point my feet surrendered. I could no longer bear to push my body so much. I got the Río San Juan in the middle of the night, and that’s where the coyote left me. “Leave me,” I said. “Go home. Thank you for taking me this far and say hello to my mother.” My mother had stayed behind to take care of my two little brothers, because my older brother left four days before me. He went to the United States. It’s unfortunate that I couldn’t go with my brother, but to get to the north of the country from the south of the country I would have had to pass by lots of police checkpoints and I would have been captured and kept prisoner. Or worse, killed or tortured. Only God knows, so I had to go this way. At the Río San Juan, a man came in a small boat, and I asked him if there was military on the other side of the river. He asked me where I was going. And so I started to look him over. “I’m going to Costa Rica,” I said. But I didn’t tell him I was leader in the Movimiento Campesino or anything like that. He seemed like a sensible guy. I told him I wanted to go to Costa Rica to look for work, because in Nicaragua there isn’t any work, and with this revolution, well, the whole country has been disrupted. “Look,” he tells me, “there is a military base … and through there you go to get to Costa Rica legally.” “No,” I said. “I’ll come with you in your boat. Do me a favor. I’ll pay you if you take me away from here, take me across the San Juan to where there aren’t police.” Finally I told him who I was, that I was a leader in the Movimiento Campesino and that my comrade in the fight, Victor Manuel Díaz González, is a political prisoner of the dictatorship and was suffering persecution. I, too, needed to leave the country because if I don’t they’d kill me if I stayed. If not, then they’d imprison me. “Ah,” he said. “Now I understand. Let me call my cousin, who will help you cross.” That’s how I crossed the San Juan, with the cousin of this man with the boat. We crossed the marshes and then over the mountains and through some orange groves. And that’s where he left me, in the orange groves, and he told me if I hear a motorcycle that would be the army and that I should run. So I went running and he pointed to a mountain and he told me that mountain is Costa Rican territory. … If you can get to this mountain, they can no longer persecute you. So that’s how I went.And then I heard the motorcycle behind me so I took off running toward the mountains. At this point, I had already walked for 12 hours, faint with hunger, but I had to keep going to save my own life. I think of the pain of my mother who had stayed in Nicaragua without knowing what happened to me. And the fear, because I had been told that the Nicaraguan army had set up mines on the border to stop “escaping terrorists,” who were supposedly us. … But I finally made it over the border and got in contact with a taxi that the cousin of the man with the boat had called. … I got in his car, and he took me to Los Chiles de Costa Rica. And so I was saved, thanks to God. I went to the Costa Rican migration offices, very dirty. And everyone was looking at me weird, asking, “Where has this person come from? Who is he?”  Zeas Paz. Photo by Jacob Spetzler.I presented myself to the Costa Rican police and I told them I was a leader of the Movimiento Campesino de Nicaragua, that was I was in the in the tranque Del Tule, and I had been present for the massacre at the Mothers of April protests, and that I had been in the fight for five years. So they took my fingerprints and my name and my other data and documents, and they gave me a code and told me with this code, I would be safe in the country without danger of deportation. But that while the government of Costa Rica was committed to giving me security, that I should not leave the country or, even worse, approach the border with Nicaragua because I could become a persecuted person by the regime again. TT: What has happened since you’ve arrived in Costa Rica?Nelson Jesús Zeas Paz: I came to San José, Costa Rica, and I’ve been here for seven months since September. At first I was in a tiny town called El Rosario, living on a coffee farm with a Nicaraguan family who cares for the farm. So I was there for seven months, in cold and precarious conditions. …Thanks to God, I never went without food, because this family helped me with provisions. At this point, my brother was on the border with Mexico and the United States, and it was terrible. At the border with Mexico, the border guards captured my brother and gave him to the North American police … who put him in jail in Florida. He was a prisoner for four months, with four months of danger of being deported.If he had been deported, he would have been sent to the National Airport of Nicaragua, where the police there would have taken him because he was my brother. … I went to the UN offices here in Costa Rica and explained the situation about us having to leave quickly because of the [Nicaraguan] regime, and everything that happened with our families in danger in Nicaragua. That I had a brother who was a prisoner in the US because he had illegally entered the country. … We got in contact with Human Rights Commission in Miami to have them help get my brother out of the North American jail and not deported to Nicaragua, where he obviously would have been imprisoned. Over months, with their help, we were able to get a card that showed a violation of human rights of my brother in Nicaragua just for being my brother. They sent it to the immigration offices in the United States.Thanks to God, in February of this year, they let him out on a bail of $20,000. That’s on top of the $10,000 it cost to get my brother out of the country. That’s to pay for the coyote, transport on the road out of Nicaragua. He wasn’t deported, and he’s out on bail for an undetermined amount of time. I’m not really sure how this works in North America but for now, he’s free.TT: What will your brother do now?Nelson Jesús Zeas Paz: He’s seeking asylum as a political refugee for being persecuted as my brother by the regime. Now he’s with my dad, thank God. And during this time I was here in the bache [a kind of refugee camp] for 7 months. But we give thanks to Costa Rica for opening their doors to us. Hugging us to their chest and giving us the security that I we didn’t have in Nicaragua. The march on May 30 is a great example. … They respect the fundamental human rights of free movement, free expression, and it’s a democratic country. TT: What has your life been like here in San José, since leaving the coffee farm?Nelson Jesús Zeas Paz: I live in place, a house that I don’t want to say the exact location of for security reasons. But I live with other Nicaraguans. We’re all activists as defenders of human rights, and we’re also academics. … To be honest, the life here is a little difficult, because there are so many immigrants. There’s Nicaraguans but there’s also Venezuelans who are suffering persecution. It’s hard to find work. We have permission to work, but it’s hard to actually find a job. It’s difficult for us as leaders to see our people. In a certain way, they’re okay. In Nicaragua, at least they were able to eat. But that was before their rights were violated, before the April insurrection. Now sometimes they eat, sometimes not. Sometimes just once a day. There are some that sleep in fields, others who look for food in garbage dumps. Boys in the street who can’t find work, selling anything they can.It has been difficult, and it will be a difficult life, but we are waiting, day by day, adapting. And waiting to see what comes. Jacob Spetzler / The Tico TimesRead more in The Tico Times about Nicaraguan refugees in Costa Rica: A Nicaraguan refugee in Costa Rica tells his story (Part 1) Fleeing Nicaragua: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 Nelson Jesus Zeas Paz, 25, is one of the 55,000 Nicaraguan refugees and exiles who have fled to Costa Rica. In Part 1 of this story, he described witnessing much of the unrest that occurred from his perspective as a protestor and leader in the Movimiento Campesino (Farmers Movement). Read: A Nicaraguan refugee in Costa Rica tells his story (Part 1) Facebook Commentscenter_img Related posts:From Río San Juan to San José: A Nicaraguan refugee in Costa Rica tells his story Nicaragua expels three US officials: State Dept As Nicaragua elections approach, banned opposition decries Ortega’s budding dictatorship Nicaraguans gather in Costa Rica to celebrate release of political prisonerslast_img read more

RTL Groupowned production company FremantleMedia

first_imgRTL Group-owned production company FremantleMedia’s French subsidiary is creating a subsidiary dedicated to digital-terrestrial channels, according to local reports.The new unit, 123 Production, will focus on supplying content to digital channels, soon to grow in number to 25 national services following the launch of six new channels at the end of this year. The new subsidiary is likely to focus on the development of reality shows, according to the reports.last_img

Telenor Satellite Broadcasting has terminated its

first_imgTelenor Satellite Broadcasting has terminated its agreement with Bulgarian broadcast services provider Neterra to provide a white label DTH platform to offer pay TV services in Bulgaria.Telenor’s satellite arm said that the project was not progressing according to its expectations and that it had therefore terminated the contract.Telenor Satellite Broadasting and Neterra signed an agreement in March whereby the latter took two transponders on the Thor 6 satellite at 1° West to broadcast a bouquet of channels that would be offered to third-party operators on a white-label basis.In December, Neterra also signed a DTH deal with Israel’s Spacecom for capacity at the 4° West position.Telenor plans to increase its capacity for central and eastern Europe in the second half of next year with the launch of Thor 7.last_img read more

Amazon is opening up its Prime Video service to c

Amazon is opening up its Prime Video service to c

first_imgAmazon is opening up its Prime Video service to “creators and storytellers”, in a move widely seen as a direct shot at online video rival YouTube.Amazon Video Direct is a new self-service program that will let users make their video content available to Amazon customers, including tens of millions of Prime members.Content creators can choose to make their videos available for free to Amazon Prime Video customers and earn royalties based on hours streamed.They can also opt to offer content to all Amazon customers on an ad-supported basis, to rent or own for a one-time purchase price, or as an add-on subscription through Amazon’s Streaming Partners Program. The latter already lets viewers stream content from premium networks like Starz and Showtime.“There are more options for distribution than ever before and with Amazon Video Direct, for the first time, there’s a self-service option for video providers to get their content into a premium streaming subscription service,” said Jim Freeman, vice-president of Amazon Video.“We’re excited to make it even easier for content creators to find an audience, and for that audience to find great content.”Amazon Video Direct (AVD) is now available in all the countries where Amazon Video is available – the US, UK, Germany, Austria and Japan.Amazon customers will be able to access new movies, TV shows, docu-series and music videos from content creators, while those creators will get performance metrics on how their videos are performing on the site.These metrics include the number of minutes a title was streamed for, projected revenue, payment history, or number of subscribers, letting video providers optimise the way they offer and promote content to customers.At the same time, Amazon announced it is Amazon Video Direct Stars program, which gives video providers the chance to earn a “monthly bonus” based on customer engagement.This bonus will come from a US$1 million per-month fund, which will be shared among the creators of the 100 most popular AVD titles on Prime Video each month, and will be paid out on top of any other revenue earned.Video creators and providers who use AVD to make their titles available in Prime Video will automatically be enrolled in the scheme, according to Amazon.Toy brand Mattel, fashion MCN Stylehaul, Conde Nast Entertainment and other major online brands such as The Guardian, Mashable, Business Insider and Machinima have all signed up as launch partners for AVD.last_img read more

The Bureau Amazon Prime Video has acquired French

The Bureau Amazon Prime Video has acquired French

first_imgThe BureauAmazon Prime Video has acquired French dramas for the first time, as speculation over an international SVOD launch grows.The platform has bought The Bureau, which comes from Federation Entertainment and The Oligarchs Productions, and Baron Noir, which Eric Benzekri and Jean-Baptiste Delafon created.This comes soon after the European Commission indicated plans to force SVOD platforms such as Amazon and Netflix to ensure 20% of their catalogue is European.It also comes amid increasing speculation Amazon will expand its streaming service beyond the US, UK, Ireland, Germany, Austria and Japan with a full international offering. Earlier this week, Ampere Analysis said such a launch was “imminent”.The new dramas will launch on Amazon later this month, with season one of The Bureau debuting on June 17 and season two going out on August 26.The Bureau follows a member of a clandestine branch of the French Secret Service, who returns home after a six-year mission in Damascus.Baron Noir, which Pulp Fiction’s Ziad Doueiri directs, follows a French politician who wants revenge against his political enemies, while concurrently fighting to save his election after he is double-crossed.Other recent Amazon acquisitions include AMC martial arts drama Into the Badlands and ITV’s children’s toon Thunderbirds Are Go.Earlier this week it was reported the entertainment arm of the e-commerce conglom has ordered five new pilots, namely Benicio Del Toro’s Carnival Row, Kevin MacDonald’s Strange New Things, period drama Tropicana, Amy Sherman-Palladino’s The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel and The Legend of Master Legend.last_img read more