Councillors told to look at bigger picture

first_img TAGSFianna FáilLimerick CountyMichael CollinsNewspolitics Previous articleHomelessness is a real worry in AbbeyfealeNext articleRacing 92 prove too much for Munster in Paris Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Twitter Michael Collins, Fianna Fáil. Photo: Cian ReinhardtCOUNCILLORS in the Adare-Rathkeale Municipal District have been accused of depriving Limerick people of a state-of-the-art Great Southern Greenway.Council members in Newcastle West Municipal District were informed at this Wednesday’s monthly meeting that the six councillors in Adare-Rathkeale had declined to match their €45,000 annual contribution towards the greenway from General Municipal Allocation (GMA) funding over the next five years.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Fianna Fáil councillor Michael Collins suggested that Adare-Rathkeale representatives should “look at the bigger picture”.“The greenway will have a huge positive impact, not only on Newcastle West and Rathkeale, but will benefit all of Limerick,” he told council members.Fine Gael councillor Liam Galvin said he was disappointed that council members in the neighbouring district had decided not to match their €45,000 annual funding allocation.“This is the single biggest thing to happen to Newcastle West and Adare-Rathkeale districts. They are depriving people of a state-of-the-art greenway. Do we need a special meeting on this?” he asked.Director of Services for Newcastle West Municipal District Gordon Daly said he did not want the wrong message to leave the council chamber. He was also conscious of respecting the decision of councillors in Adare-Rathkeale.“The project is not in jeopardy. The project is on target,” Mr Daly commented. Facebook Advertisement Linkedin NewsPoliticsCouncillors told to look at bigger pictureBy Alan Jacques – January 12, 2020 359 Population of Mid West region increased by more than 3,000 in past year RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img Vicky calls for right to die with dignity Limerick on Covid watch list WhatsApp Shannon Airport braced for a devastating blow Email Print Local backlash over Aer Lingus threat Unstoppable Sean shows that all things are possiblelast_img read more

City seeks to fill top management spots

first_img Pinterest Twitter By admin – April 14, 2018 Assistant City Manager Konrad Hildebrandt, the second highest ranking city administrator, will leave his post later this month for a job in Utah, a departure that will leave all three of Odessa’s top management positions unfilled with a permanent hire.Only Interim City Manager Michael Marrero remains, but the Odessa City Council has yet to appoint him permanently to the post. Marrero, who has worked for the city for two decades, says he wants the job. And the City Council has not considered any other candidates.Now, Marrero said he plans to hire the firm Strategic Government Resources to recruit new assistant managers for the two vacant positions, one of which was posted for applicants about a month ago.“The immediate plan obviously is to continue to operate as we have,” Marrero said. “I’m just going to have to work harder. I’m just going to have to take on more roles and more responsibilities.”Marrero said he also planned to lean on other supervisors and department heads while he seeks candidates for the assistant city manager jobs.Marrero began serving as the interim in September, after three members of the City Council formed a majority to fire former City Manager Richard Morton.Marrero had previously served as Morton’s top deputy, managing departments of the city that deal directly with the public apart from fire and police services. Those included parks, public works, code enforcement and planning and zoning.But after his appointment to the interim head of the city, Marrero’s previous post remained unfilled.Hildebrandt’s duties in Odessa focused on overseeing internal city functions like finance and risk management. He began working for the city in March 2014, after serving as city manager in Cedar Hills, Utah, a smaller city.He is leaving to accept a job as city manager of Riverton, Utah, a city of more than 40,000 people south of Salt Lake City. His last day working in Odessa is April 25.“It was just an opportunity that I had,” Hildebrandt said. “It was fantastic here, and a great opportunity for me.” Facebook Twitter Facebook Local NewsGovernment WhatsApp WhatsApp Previous articleNUGGETS: What if you could believe exactly what the Bible says?Next articleFamily Grace McDonald lived with speaks out admin City seeks to fill top management spots Pinterestlast_img read more

Man in his 20s dies following road traffic collision in Dunamanagh

first_img Facebook WhatsApp Previous articleSharp rise in complaints indicate serious difficulty for the Western Trust – McCrossanNext articleImagine says broadband plans for west Donegal are on hold due to low uptake admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By admin – July 22, 2016 Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire A man in his 20s has died in a collision near Dunamanagh.The silver Peugeot in which he was travelling struck a bridge on the Longland Road at around 7.20am this morning.Another male who was also in the car was taken to hospital where he is currently receiving treatment for injuries that are not believed to be life threatening.Police are appealing for witnesses to come forward.The Longland Road remains closed between Cumber Road and Ballyarton Road.Local Councillor Patsy Kelly say it’s a notorious busy stretch of road:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/patsy530-1.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Google+ Twittercenter_img Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Pinterest Pinterest Homepage BannerNews WhatsApp Twitter Man in his 20s dies following road traffic collision in Dunamanagh Facebook Google+ 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic last_img read more

“The choice is clear” – Theresa May

first_img Harps come back to win in Waterford Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty By News Highland – March 22, 2019 Facebook Pinterest Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR AudioHomepage BannerNews DL Debate – 24/05/21 “The choice is clear” – Theresa May WhatsApp Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction center_img Twitter WhatsApp Twitter Facebook Google+ Previous articleFunerals of three teenagers to take place in TyroneNext articleHorgan knows points will be hard come by against Rovers News Highland Google+ FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 British Prime Minister Theresa May says people have a clear choice after EU leaders agreed to delay Brexit until the 22nd of May – IF the withdrawal agreement is passed by the UK parliament next week.If the British Prime Minister’s deal fails for a third time – the EU says the extention will be until the 12th of April, when Britain would have to decide to either elect MEPs or leave with no deal.Speaking in Brussels last night, the European Council President Donald Tusk says the UK will have to decide the future of Brexit by then……………..Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/07tusk.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Speaking after the meeting with EU leaders, British Prime Minister Theresa May says the House of Commons now has to back the deal………..Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/07mayfri.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24thlast_img read more

Immigration law threatens tag renewals

first_img Email the author Print Article By Jaine Treadwell The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Sponsored Content Published 11:00 pm Thursday, August 25, 2011 Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson The U.S. Department of Justice and other organizations are suing the state to block the law.Alabama’s immigration law mandates that residents will have to demonstrate United States citizenship when applying for or renewing a motor vehicle license plate, applying for or renewing a driver’s license or non-driver identification card or applying for or renewing a business license. Citizenship must be shown by presenting one of those documents.Because the county’s mail option renewal is relatively new, Allen said only about 5 percent of the 36,000 to 38,000 annual tag renewals are through mail.“As more people were becoming aware of the mail option renewal the percentage was rising,” Allen said. Book Nook to reopen If today were Sept. 1, the Pike County Probate Judge’s Office would have to temporarily suspend the mail option renewal of vehicle tags.Pike County Probate Judge Wes Allen said his office was notified on Aug.1 to prepare for a mandate included in the state’s new immigration law that will force all residents to prove citizenship before buying tags or renewing licenses beginning Sept. 1, 2011.“To prove citizenship, residents can show a valid driver’s license, passport or Social Security card,” Allen said. “Our office will be required to make a copy of each document provided and keep a file with that information.”center_img Next UpWhat this mandate means is the residents can no longer renew vehicle tags on line or by mail.However, Allen said that the Pike County Probate Office doesn’t offer the online option.“We began offering the mail option renewal in March 2010 and were moving toward online renewal before this mandate,” he said. By The Penny Hoarder Immigration law threatens tag renewals Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits If the state’s immigration law goes into effect as written, Allen said the Probate Office will temporarily suspend the mail option renewal.Allen said that he supports the spirit of the law and he is committed to running the Pike County Probate Judge Office in the most effective and efficient manner possible.“The Legislature makes the laws and the Probate Office follows them,” he said.“What this mandate will mean to Pike County residents is that there will probably be longer lines because of the suspension of mail order renewal. It will also take us a little longer to get the paperwork done because it will require a few more steps.“But, we will continue to work hard and run this office in the best and most efficient way possible.”According to the Associated Press, Deputy Assistant U.S. Attorney General William Orrick told U.S. District Judge Sharon Blackburn that sections of Alabama’s law should be blocked because they conflict with federal law.The law allows police officers, in conducting routine traffic stops, to arrest those they suspect of being illegal immigrants.Other provisions make it a crime to transport or provide shelter to an illegal immigrant. It also requires schools to report the immigration status of students. Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day You Might Like Grassroots Meeting gets high marks The class work that was “turned in” at the Pike County Extension Office Grassroots Meeting Tuesday has been evaluated and… read more Around the WebDoctor: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Health VideosIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthTop 4 Methods to Get Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Latest Storieslast_img read more

Utah College Track Roundup: 4/20

first_img Tags: Clay Invitational/Mt. Sac Relays/Southern Utah/Weber State Brad James April 21, 2018 /Sports News – Local Utah College Track Roundup: 4/20 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailAZUSA, Caif.-Friday, Southern Utah University’s track and field team competed at the prestigious Bryan Clay Invitational at Azusa Pacific University, which saw them hold their own against several Power 5 schools.Star sprinter Tre James finishd fourth in the 100 and 200-meter dashes respectively, while teammates, Nate Osterstock and Christian Ricketts placed third and fourth, respectively, in the men’s 1500-meter run.Meanwhile Weber State’s Abbigael Brecht placed second in the women’s high jump with Anthony Gregory of Weber State finishing fourth in the men’s high jump.WALNUT, Calif.-As the Mount Sac Relays continued Friday, several Utah-based star track and field collegiate athletes shone amid the competition of numerous Power 5 schools.The Utah State women’s 4 x 400 relay team placed fifth overall in a time of 3:47.13, while in the women’s 5000-meter run, Utah’s Jessica Sams placed fourth overall in a time of 16:14.44 and Utah State’s Tavia Dutson finished seventh in a time of 16:17.24.In the field events, BYU’s Leah Thompson placed fifth in the women’s discus with a toss of 155-07 feet.In the mens’ discus, BYU’s Jefferson Jarvis placed seventh with a toss of 165-10 feet and in the women’s shot put, the Cougars’ Kassie Nagel placed sixth overall, netting a toss of 45-10.75 feet.The meet will resume Saturday. Written bylast_img read more

Total acquires French renewable gas producer Fonroche Biogaz

first_imgFonroche Biogaz designs, builds and operates anaerobic digestion units and has an installed capacity of nearly 500GWh Total headquarters in Paris, France. (Credit: Wikipedia.org/I Tangopaso.) French oil and gas giant Total has announced the acquisition of Fonroche Biogaz, a renewable gas producer, for an undisclosed amount.Fonroche Biogaz designs, builds and operates anaerobic digestion units in France.With a portfolio of seven units in operation and four more in the pipeline, Fonroche’s installed capacity is nearly 500GWh, which doubled between 2019 and 2020. It enjoys a market share of 10% in renewable gas in the country.With a workforce of 85 employees, Fonroche is claimed to have developed industrial and technological expertise across the entire renewable gas value chain.By acquiring Fonroche, Total is expected to significantly develop its renewable gas market and also has prospects for rapid growth across the French market and in international expansion.Total gas, renewables & power president Philippe Sauquet said: “This acquisition is consistent with our strategy and our climate ambition to get to Net Zero by 2050. We believe that renewable gas has a key role to play in the energy transition as it contributes to reducing the carbon intensity of natural gas – and we support the imposition of renewable gas incorporation in natural gas networks.“In 2020, we stated our intention to contribute to the development of this sector, which we expect to become more competitive in the next few years. We intend to produce 1.5 terawatt-hours (TWh) of biomethane a year by 2025 and Fonroche Biogas is therefore the cornerstone of our development in this market.”Fonroche Biogaz acquisition to enable Total to expand presence in the sectorThe acquisition is expected to enable Total become a major player in French and European renewable gas markets.In addition, the Fonroche Biogaz acquisition is said to allow the company to significantly expand its presence in the sector, where it already has a presence through its subsidiaries including Méthanergy, PitPoint and Clean Energy in Benelux and the US respectively.Last month, the company signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Clean Energy to form a $100m 50/50 joint venture to develop renewable gas production projects in the US.By 2030, Total plans to produce 4 to 6TWh of biomethane annually.Last November, Total  said that it will use Honeywell UOP Ecofinin process technology to produce renewable fuels, primarily for the aviation industry, at its Grandpuits platform at Seine-et-Marne in north central France.last_img read more

DENNIS, PATRICIA

first_imgA mass of Christian burial was celebrated June 24 at St. Aloysius R. C. Church for Patricia Dennis, formerly of Jersey City. She passed away June 21 at home surrounded by her loving family. Born in Brooklyn, Patricia was a resident of Jersey City for over 45 years prior to moving to Bedminster. An active member of St. Aloysius Parish, she was the Irishwoman of the Year in 2002 for the Knights of Columbus Council 475. She was a crossing guard for over 30 years at the corner of Belmont and West Side Avenues, where she watched over the children of St. Aloysius Grammar and High Schools. She retired in 2011.She was predeceased by her husband, John T. Dennis. She is survived by her daughter, Laura Frantz and her husband Steven. She was the grandmother of Kyle Frantz and the sister of Maureen McCann.Services arranged by the McLaughlin Funeral Home, 625 Jersey City.last_img read more

TeamChild at risk of losing the funding game

first_img TeamChild at risk of losing the funding game Associate Editor “What would you do with a 14-year-old, retarded pregnant girl charged with battery on her mother?“Or a child, cared for by her octogenarian great grandmother, who is severely mentally ill and harasses her equally aged next-door neighbor to get an exciting ride in a police car?“How might one hope to arrange effective supervision of probation for a child whose own parents are incarcerated?”Second Judicial Circuit Judge Jonathan Sjostrom posed those very tough questions in a February 4 open letter.This Tallahassee juvenile delinquency judge already knows the answer:Let TeamChild, a program combining the skills of social workers and lawyers— through the Second Circuit Public Defenders Office, Legal Services of North Florida, and Florida State University College of Law’s Advocacy Center—tackle these most difficult cases of children charged with crimes.But as successful as TeamChild is in serving all of the needs of the whole child charged with a crime, the program is in danger of ceasing to exist because it is running out of money. Generous three-year start-up funding totaling $1.38 million from The Florida Bar Foundation for the TeamChild program ran out in June 2003. Last year’s legislative budget crisis nixed the hope of the program being funded through the Department of Juvenile Justice, as anticipated.“We are holding it together with spit and polish,” said Second Judicial Public Defender Nancy Daniels, who employs a social worker in her office to refer juvenile delinquent cases to legal services lawyers.“I’ve seen all the good it’s done with many, many delinquent children and their families. We need manna from heaven. If we had our druthers, we would have a steady funding source.”Instead, Kris Knab, executive director of Legal Services of North Florida, is furiously applying for mini-grants, dipping into her own pocket, squeezing a few thousand from the Tallahassee police chief, organizing Jazz for Justice benefits, arranging to reap some proceeds from donated goods at a thrift shop, and otherwise begging for more to keep the $121,500-a year program running that serves 112 clients in Leon and Gadsden counties. She has enough money to keep the program afloat through June. Legislators, she wonders, are you listening?“These children are on the edge of falling into nothingness for the rest of their life. Once they go over the edge, it’s hard to get them back up,” Knab said.“They’ve been labeled and kicked out, because at some point, too, your family gets disgusted you are a burden. This program is catching them right there at the edge of disaster and turning them into total successes.”She is quick to add: “Not all of them. We can’t catch all of them.”But there are so many successes to celebrate.Victor Williams, the social worker at the Second Judicial Circuit Public Defender’s Office, can put names and faces on those successes. Without TeamChild, Williams said he knows children will be placed inappropriately in juvenile delinquency residential commitment programs that won’t meet their real needs, because they don’t address the underlying issues that contribute to criminal activity: the need for special education services and mental health care, for starters.“I know most of the clients and their families, and it’s pretty cool to really help out,” Williams said. “I’ll be at a grocery store and bump into a kid’s mom, who tells me she appreciates her kid is on the honor roll now.“Or I may see someone who was a problem kid who DCF (Department of Children and Families) placed with a sister, and he tells me, ‘Yeah, man, I’m staying with my sister and I’m working on my GED at Lively (Vocational-Technical School) now.’“This program gives the client a sense that someone is listening to their needs,” Williams said. “And we don’t just drop the case. When problems arise, they know they can call me, and I can speak with a civil attorney and get things done. It makes parents feels like there is someone to reach out and touch.”TeamChild’s triumphs go beyond anecdotal stories.Proven success has been measured by an independent evaluation by Stefan Norrbin, a professor of economics, and David Rasmussen, dean of the College of Social Sciences at FSU.The goal of their 2002 study was to find out whether or not TeamChild significantly reduces the arrest rate among troubled youth who had been previously arrested two to three times a year. The evaluation found that the TeamChild program lowered post-treatment arrest rates by 45 percent. And the project generated between $2.44 and $3.91 of benefits for each dollar spent by saving law-enforcement and social-services costs, and as well as losses suffered by victims.“Whether a kid recidivates isn’t affected,” Rasmussen explained in an interview. “But if they do recidivate, it’s not as often. These kids are incredibly troubled, and there’s been lots of child abuse. The idea of saying they will never do anything again is probably heroic.”TeamChild, he concluded, is a cost-effective, beneficial alternative to “not just warehousing kids terribly cheated by society, by their parents actually, as a matter of fact, because they have had no one to advocate for them.”“The results are excellent on this one-year study,” said Kent Spuhler, director of Florida Legal Services. “If you look at that study, they were saying, ‘Boy, we really want to study these children two, three years from now, because it looks like the results will be even more impressive.”Spuhler said the TeamChild project advocates “ran into the perfect storm.”“You do something that you hope will work. We conceptualized it. Fortunately, The Florida Bar Foundation is willing to do risk funding, so they were able to put the money in the project when it was our idea. Then, when our idea was proven to work, we had the budget storm (during last year’s legislative session),” he said.And there was a shipwreck of funding that has left a scramble to piece it back together.“What we find is families have legal barriers, not just social service barriers. And if you don’t get rid of the legal barriers, social service work doesn’t have an opportunity to achieve success,” Spuhler said.The original TeamChild program was created in 1995 in Seattle, Washington, and has been replicated in Leon and Gadsden counties, as well as Broward County, with great success through the Foundation start-up funding. (Broward County’s TeamChild program serves only girls and the county’s special children’s services taxing district has prevented the program from shutting down, Sphuler said.)TeamChild’s fans include a cross-section of court officials, including Florida Supreme Court Justice Barbara Pariente, who chairs the Steering Committee on Families and Children in the Court; Pat Badland, chief of the Office of Court Improvement at the Office of the State Courts Administrator; Second Judicial Circuit State Attorney Willie Meggs, president of the Florida Prosecuting Attorneys Association; Daniels, president of the Florida Public Defender Association; and Leon County Sheriff Larry Campbell. They have written letters of support in a desperate search for funding that runs out in June.In his letter, Judge Sjostrom summed up TeamChild with a strong endorsement:“Our laws promise to both punish criminal conduct and also to address social, educational, mental health and other basic needs that, when neglected, breed juvenile crime. In my experience, TeamChild was indispensable in keeping the second part of the promise to the most troubled children.“Without TeamChild, each case would simply be processed as just another juvenile crime. I cannot pretend that we succeeded with all such children. But without TeamChild, many, many more children would have been lost in the system.” TeamChild at risk of losing the funding game March 1, 2004 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

Fostering financial wellness for your members now and post-pandemic

first_imgWe’re talking about how to provide the best financial education possible to support your members through the COVID-19 crisis, and foster lasting financial wellness for them into the future. This pandemic is having a profound effect on every American’s financial health, and credit unions can position themselves to be the guiding hand that members need right now. We’re going to dive in and explore some of the strategies and opportunities that exist to help your members thrive through the crisis and beyond.Key Takeaways:[01:23] Americans who resisted online banking technology have been forced to use it during the shutdown.  [03:41] The credit unions that focus on helping members get financially healthy through online tools will be a step ahead.  Consistency and clear message when introducing members to online tools is key. [08:44] It is important that the credit union staff embraces the technology updates first. We need all the staff to buy-in and be proficient on the technology so they can help members.[13:16] Interaction and engagement is everything! Many credit unions are engaging members in free challenges and rewards for completing financial education.  continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more