Anti-Corruption Children’s Book Jaadeh! Translated into Bassa Language

first_imgAlthough the Bassa language is not widely taught in Liberia, it is, however, taught at Spiritan Academy, one of Monrovia’s elite schools, which sent student and faculty representatives to the official launch of Jaadeh! at the University of Liberia on 10 May. (Photo courtesy: Front Row Media Liberia)Renowned Liberian academician and author Robtel Neajai Pailey has done it again. This time around with the translation of the Pan-African anti-corruption children’s book Jaadeh! into one of Liberia’s most spoken local languages, Bassa.Released in January 2019, Jaadeh! is a dual language sequel to the critically acclaimed anti-corruption children’s book Gbagba. Both books were illustrated by Liberian visual artist Chase Walker and published by One Moore Book. While gbagba loosely translates as trickery or corruption in Bassa, jaadeh is its opposite. And so, the eight-year-old twin main characters Sundaymah and Sundaygar encounter examples of the opposite of corruption in the second book. In a telephone interview with the Daily Observer, Dr. Pailey explained that she commissioned Bassa prelate and linguist, Bishop Amos W. Gbaa, Sr., to translate Jaadeh! into Bassa to honor the language and to have it taught in schools in Liberia and elsewhere.“It is sad that many Liberians do not value their local languages and the situation is getting worse with many young people unable to speak any of the country’s 16 languages—myself included”, said Dr. Pailey.She continued: “In response to this situation, I decided to collaborate with Bishop Gbaa to have Jaadeh! translated into Bassa to encourage its use in schools, homes, churches, mosques, etc.” Released in January 2019, Jaadeh! is a dual language sequel to the critically acclaimed anti-corruption children’s book Gbagba.Although the Bassa language is not widely taught in Liberia, it is, however, taught at Spiritan Academy, one of Monrovia’s elite schools, which sent student and faculty representatives to the official launch of Jaadeh! at the University of Liberia on 10 May.According to Dr. Pailey, the translation of Jaadeh! into Bassa is the start of her quest to have both anti-corruption children’s books translated into the most widely spoken local languages in Liberia and Africa, including Kpelle and Hausa in West Africa, Swahili in East Africa, Zulu in Southern Africa, and Berber in Northern Africa.She said: “I look forward to piloting Gbagba and Jaadeh! throughout Africa, collaborating with linguists for translations into other languages, and co-producing more multi-media tools, including TV animations.”According to Dr. Pailey, the inspiration for writing Gbagba and Jaadeh! came from working in Liberia’s highest political office and experiencing corruption first-hand in every sector of society.Since its publication in 2013, Gbagba has been adopted as a supplemental reader for 3rd through 5th grades in Liberia and for Primary 3 in Ghana. Through a grant from the Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA), the book has also been adapted into a radio drama and full-length stage play by the legendary Flomo Theater as well as a song and music video by prominent Liberian rapper Takun J. Jaadeh! has similarly been adapted into a song and music video featuring Takun J and US-based vocalist Ella Mankon Pailey, Dr. Pailey’s younger sister. There are plans to produce other multi-media adaptations of Jaadeh!, including a Youtube video of the book being read in English and Bassa by Dr. Pailey and Bishop Gbaa.Visit www.gbagba-jaadeh.com for more information about both books. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Anonymous NFL Scouts Torn on Mason Rudolph’s NFL Potential

first_imgNFL Draft Twitter has been all over the board about Mason Rudolph and his ceiling as a quarterback in the NFL.Some scouts and prognosticators have dubbed him a lock to be a top-5 pick, while others — including anonymous scouts who weighed in on a poll for a story that run on Tuesday on Sports Illustrated — have been more bearish.Almost every media outlet has tabbed Rudolph as a top-5 candidate to win the Heisman Trophy at this stage in the season. But as for his NFL upside? Well, let’s just say AFC and area scouts feel his production won’t translate to the next level.“He’s O.K.,” said one AFC scouting director. “He’s playing in a great, quarterback-friendly offense. Probably has a top 10-caliber group of receivers. Gundy is a great coach and does an outstanding job with that offense. I’m not sold on him as a top guy . . . He’s a decent athlete. He’s tough and runs that offense well. But not sure the video game numbers he’s gonna put up this year will translate to the NFL.”“He’s got good size,” was the positive an AFC personnel exec found before echoing the sentiment, “but his arm strength is lacking and he’s inconsistent with his accuracy.” [Sports Illustrated]Another scout — an area scout (and, of course, anonymous) — went as far as to say that Rudolph might have to go several days before getting the call from an NFL team.Added an area scout: “Not as good as the media wants everyone to believe; he’s a Day 3 guy. His accuracy isn’t as good as the numbers show—his receivers make a lot of tough catches for him. Arm strength is adequate, not tops. What’s the difference between him and Bryce Petty?” [Sports Illustrated]Bryce Petty, huh? No kidding?While it’s way too early to start projecting the NFL Draft order just three games into the season, I also think it’s way too early to dub Rudolph a system QB and Petty-look-alike. The guy’s been a starter and productive player for three-and-a-half years!Rudolph might be in a productive system that gives him opportunities he might not have in a pro-style system, but to say he’ll be a Day 3 guy (rounds 4-7) seems a bit far-fetched. But it’s clear his NFL Draft stock will be a topic of debate for much of the season as the Cowboys march towards Big 12 title contention.If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img read more