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After Mt Everest police officer set to scale Kanchenjunga

After Mt Everest police officer set to scale Kanchenjunga

first_imgKolkata: West Bengal police assistant sub inspector Rudra Prasad Halder, who had successfully scaled the Mount Everest in 2016, will soon embark on Kanchenjunga expedition.Halder, who presently works with the wireless department of Bengal police, is a mountaineer with repute and has already successfully made 21 mountain summits, the most notable one was the Mount Everest when he reached its summit on May 21, 2016. Sharing his expedition plan with the Millennium Post, Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataHalder said: ” I will leave for Kathmandu from Kolkata airport on Thursday and will staying there Saturday. The main expedition will start from Taplejung on April 8 and after walking for 11 days we will be reaching the base camp of Kanchenjunga. Then it will take another 40 to 45 days tentatively to climb up to the summit which has a height of 8586 metres.” Mountaineer Biplab Baidya and two other climbers will accompany Halder in the expedition. Kanchenjunga happens to be the third highest mountain peak in the world. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in state” I am grateful to the Bengal police for funding my expedition. My seniors have always encouraged and supported me. It was Director General (DG) Virendra (Sir) who flagged off my expedition on Tuesday,” Halder said. He recollected the fateful day of May 20, 2014 when mountaineer Chhanda Gayen went missing along with two sherpas in an avalanche while descending the western side of Mount Kanchenjunga in Nepal. Later, it was declared all three of them died in the avalanche. Halder had attempted to scale the Mount Everest in 2015 but had to stall his expedition due to the devastating earthquake in Nepal. Halder was trained at Uttarkashi’s Nehru Institute of Mountaineering. He is associated with a Sonarpur-based trekking club Arohi. It may be mentioned that there are four climbing routes to reach the summit of Kanchenjunga, three of which are in Nepal— from the southwest, northwest and northeast— and one from northeastern Sikkim in India. Till date, the northeastern route from Sikkim has been successfully used only three times. The Indian government has banned expeditions to Kanchenjunga, and therefore this route has been closed since 2000.last_img read more

Support pours in for CM national leaders claim ECI decision biased

Support pours in for CM national leaders claim ECI decision biased

first_imgKolkata: Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee said on Thursday the destruction of Vidyasagar’s bust by the BJP was not an isolated incident as the party had been involved in similar incidents in the past as well.Taking to Twitter, Banerjee said: “Vandalising the statue of Pandit Iswar Chandra Vidyasagar may not be viewed as an isolated incident. Incidence of vandalism of statues is not a new phenomenon for BJP.” During her election campaign later in the day, Banerjee pointed out that the BJP leaders pulled down a statue of Lenin in Tripura after they came to power. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: Mamata”We can have different political ideologies but demolishing a statue is highly condemnable,” Banerjee said during her rally referring to the Tripura incident. Banerjee said the Election Commission of India’s decision to curtail the campaign time for nine Bengal seats that will vote on Sunday was biased. She alleged the step was a direct attack on democracy and taken under the directions of the BJP. She said people would give a befitting reply. The Chief Minister was not only infuriated by the enormity of the incident but was considerably vocal in her protest against the BJP. During a press conference on Wednesday, Banerjee trained her guns at the BJP for its alleged role in influencing the ECI after it curtailed the duration of campaign for the last phase. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateBanerjee’s protest against the BJP and her claims about the ECI decision was supported by various national leaders. Former Jammu and Kashmir Chief Minister Mehbooba Mufti took to Twitter to show her solidarity with the Bengal Chief Minister. She called Banerjee a lioness for speaking to BJP in the “language it understands”. Accusing the Election Commission of being biased, Mufti tweeted: ” Bengal plunged into chaos and violence on Tuesday. Why did it take ECI 2 days to impose a ban on campaigning? Was it to facilitate PM’s rallies? Such brazen bias by a constitutional body proves its subservient to the whims and fancies of BJP. How low will BJP stoop to wrest power?” National Conference leader Omar Abdullah echoing the same views asserted that the TMC chief will emerge victorious after the announcement of results. “The BJP can team up with the EC in Bengal, they can have a tailor-made campaign designed to fragment and polarise the electorate, they can have all their model code violations overlooked. None of it will matter because on the 23rd Mamata Official didi will sweep West Bengal,” Abdullah wrote on Twitter. Various prominent leaders across the country who supported Banerjee were Bahujan Samaj Party chief Mayawati, Samajwadi Party president Akhilesh Yadav and Telugu Desam national president and Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister N Chandrababu Naidu. Banerjee has also conveyed her gratitude to Naidu on her Twitter account. Mayawati said the ECI had been working under the pressure of the Centre. PM Narendra Modi and BJP National President Amit Shah have been targeting Banerjee, she said.last_img read more

Google May Have Violated Wiretap Laws

first_img 3 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. September 27, 2013 In a victory for online privacy advocates but a blow to advertisers, a federal judge in California has ruled Google may have violated wiretapping laws by scanning and reviewing users’ Gmails.Google has long scanned Gmail messages to then target advertising to its users. The company has argued the practice is perfectly within the confines of both federal and state eavesdropping laws because Gmail users give up their privacy as part of Gmail’s Terms of Service contract.U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh disagreed, saying those Terms of Service “did not explicitly notify Plaintiffs that Google would intercept users’ emails for the purposes of creating user profiles or providing targeted advertising.”What’s more, even if Gmail account holders consented to having their emails searched, the people with whom those users are communicating didn’t. Google has claimed that users of, say, Microsoft’s Outlook, should know that Google will view their mail when sent to a Gmail account.Related: Google Looking Beyond ‘Cookies’ to Track People OnlineKoh was unconvinced, saying she “cannot conclude that any party — Gmail users or non-Gmail users — has consented to Google’s reading of email for the purposes of creating user profiles or providing targeted advertising.”The ruling, part of a proposed class action against Google, is a big win for privacy advocates, who have complained that technology companies have too much access to personal information and are not overt enough in explaining how customer information and data are used.The chorus for more protections has only gotten louder since it was revealed that companies like Google shared information with the U.S. government as the National Security Agency spied on American emails, texts and phone calls.Still, companies have long found that there is a potentially high value proposition for advertisers in targeting marketing toward users based on their interests. Google, for instance, has long tied advertising to search results from users. Gmail, it argues, is an extension of that.But Google has found itself more and more in the crosshairs of the privacy-protection crowd. Earlier this month, the company found out its capture of data over open Wi-Fi routers also could violate federal wiretapping laws. Google captured data through cars sent throughout the company to record images for its Google Street View maps. It has said it did so to improve its location-services features, but broader content was captured by the cars.Google is not alone. In theory, Judge Koh’s ruling could affect other companies that mine free email for information to match with advertisers. Yahoo mail, for instance, has a Terms of Service that allows for broader data capture.Court: Facebook Likes Are Protected Speechcenter_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Register Now »last_img read more