Letter of support to Standing Rock: Stop pipelines, climate change and capitalism

first_imgProtest outside Museum of the American Indian in NYC insolidarity with the struggle in North Dakota, Aug. 27.Following is a statement published in mid-August on the site of The Red Nation about the important environmental struggle in North Dakota led by Indigenous peoples against the threatened pipeline under the Missouri River.Brave resisters and water protectors descended on the Dakota Access Pipeline construction site to halt its construction as it lurches towards the Mni Sose, the Missouri River, at Cannonball, N.D. The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and the Oceti Sakowin (The Great Sioux Nation) have opposed the pipeline and all pipelines trespassing treaty territory, as defined by the 1851 and 1868 Fort Laramie treaties.The proposed 1,172-mile pipeline would transport Bakken-produced heavy crude oil across the major freshwater source for countless human and nonhuman lives, the Missouri River.The Red Nation calls on everyone to support resisters and water protectors as they put their lives on the line to halt this devastating wasicu, fat-taker capitalist pipeline. On July 27, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe filed a lawsuit in the District of Columbia to enforce the tribe’s federally protected rights against the pipeline’s construction.On August 24, Standing Rock as well as several other Native Nations will have a court hearing to undo the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ approval of the pipeline.In violation of treaty law, the Corps negotiated the pipeline’s passage with the Texas-based pipeline corporation Energy Transfers through treaty territory despite massive protests citing the desecration of burial sites and culturally sensitive areas as well as threatening clean drinking water for millions. The Corps is also responsible for the continued violation of Native water rights by altering the flow of the Missouri River.In the 1950s and 1960s, the Corps, working with the Bureau of Indian Affairs, constructed 107 dams and six major dams on Native treaty territory. These dams flooded 611,642 acres. More than half of this land was Native land and resulted in the removal of 600 Native families. The Corps continues to violate Native water rights as defined by the Winters Doctrine, which prohibits altering the flow of rivers or the selling of water rights within original Native treaty territory even if that territory has been diminished.Natives and non-Natives still suffer from the devastating effects of these dams and forced relocation. The Missouri River has never recovered and 90 percent of its wild game and plants were annihilated.In typical industry fashion, the public and vulnerable Native communities will pay for cleanup and contamination when — not if — the pipeline breaks.Bakken oil and gas production, as it peaks, has already devastated the Native and non-Native communities, leaving the land and water dead and communities torn apart. Yet, oil and gas companies continue to reap huge profits as Bakken jobs decline, the land becomes more unlivable, and the social malaise of violence inherent to boomtown economies continues to wreak havoc.Meanwhile, the Energy Transfers corporation is attempting to sue the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe for protesting the pipeline and law enforcement is arresting resisters and water protectors, and the true criminals walk free. Instead of merely stopping Dakota Access, we demand that the Army Corps and Energy Transfers be held accountable for the crimes of putting at risk vulnerable water supplies, the public at large and the violation of treaty rights. We demand that their profits — and the assets of all fossil fuel companies responsible for climate change — be seized to pay for the cleanup and to help begin to mitigate the deadly effects of climate change.Capitalism is the enemy of all life and it must be stopped!We must also recognize that upholding Native treaty rights is essential to combat climate change and benefits everyone. We demand that the 1851 and 1868 Fort Laramie treaties be fully obeyed as law and the restoration of the original treaty lands to the Oceti Sakowin.In the Spirit of Crazy Horse!Hecetu Welo!The Red Nationtinyurl.com/jf2ll9kFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

World Bank: Technical potential for offshore wind worldwide tops 15TW

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享OffshoreWind.biz:The World Bank has published maps and analysis of the offshore wind technical potential for 40 more emerging markets around the world, following its report from October 2019, when eight countries’ potential was estimated to be at 3.1 TW.According to the latest report, the potential for floating wind is double the potential estimated for bottom-fixed offshore wind technology. Namely, the analysis for the 48 emerging markets presented in the maps identifies a total technical potential of 15.6 TW, including 5.5 TW of potential for fixed-bottom wind turbines and 10.1 TW for floating wind.The analysis only considers regions where an annual average of 100-metre hub-height wind speeds are greater than 7 m/s, for which the World Bank used the wind resource data by ESMAP’s & DTU’s Global Wind Atlas.Regions suitable for fixed-bottom offshore wind technology are those with water depths of less than 50 metres, whereas floating wind potential is determined for water depths from 50 to 1,000 metres. Only regions less than 200 kilometres from shore have been included, and all depths have been derived from General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO) data, according to the World Bank.“To date, relatively little research has been undertaken on the potential for offshore wind in emerging markets. Any assessment of this kind must start with an estimate of technical potential, that is, the maximum possible installed capacity with current technology, as determined by wind speed and water depth. Subsequent steps in analyzing a country or region’s offshore wind potential will add further detail to the assessment, including environmental, social, technical and economic constraints,” the World Bank states.[Adrijana Buljan]More: World Bank: 48 countries hold 15.6 TW of offshore wind technical potential World Bank: Technical potential for offshore wind worldwide tops 15TWlast_img read more

Final week to register for Fort Nelson Yeti hockey school

first_imgThe hockey school will feature novice, atom, peewee, bantam, and midget groups, along with a ladies/adult group.The cost to register is $125.00. Those wanting to take part are asked to send an email to [email protected] for registration instructions.- Advertisement –last_img

Prime Minister Calls for More Support of MSMEs

first_imgStory Highlights “There is great liquidity in the system to invest. But sometimes it is also lack of information… about the quality (and) value of, for example, working capital. They do, however, have more information and well developed polices and regulations around motor vehicle ownership, which may explain why banks are more willing to take the risk on the consumer asset than on a commercial asset, such as working capital,” the Prime Minister said. Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Andrew Holness, says private financial institutions should provide more support for business development, particularly micro, small and medium-size enterprises (MSMEs). Mr. Holness’ comments come against the background of what he says is the seeming reluctance by some banks to provide access to credit and other resources for businesses which “are good (entities) in and of themselves.” Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Andrew Holness, says private financial institutions should provide more support for business development, particularly micro, small and medium-size enterprises (MSMEs).Mr. Holness’ comments come against the background of what he says is the seeming reluctance by some banks to provide access to credit and other resources for businesses which “are good (entities) in and of themselves.”“There is great liquidity in the system to invest. But sometimes it is also lack of information… about the quality (and) value of, for example, working capital. They do, however, have more information and well developed polices and regulations around motor vehicle ownership, which may explain why banks are more willing to take the risk on the consumer asset than on a commercial asset, such as working capital,” the Prime Minister said.He was speaking at Friday’s (April 27) closing ceremony for the Development Bank of Jamaica (DBJ) Innovation Grant from New Ideas to Entrepreneurship (IGNITE) Programme pilot, at the Spanish Court Hotel, in New Kingston.Mr. Holness pointed out that as a result of Government polices now in place, there has been an increase in financial institutions’ support for business development.“We are seeing a greater trend of banks supporting businesses. Commercial and industrial lending is increasing at a noticeably significant rate, and I am very happy for that,” he said, citing this as pivotal to spurring economic growth.The Prime Minister contended, however, that for sustainable growth to occur, “lending has to (further) increase to the medium-size, small and micro enterprises, in particular.”“One of the things that we have to do is to support informal businesses in becoming formalized (by helping them) to develop business plans and getting regularized with, for example, the tax authorities,” he said.Mr. Holness said doing so will bridge the information gap on businesses encountered by financial institutions in several instances, “because for banks to take the risk on your business, they need to know about you.”“When you are formalized, when you are registered and compliant, then banks are able to better assess the risk that they are taking,” he said.Mr. Holness emphasised that the key to generating economic growth is channelling support for the private sector.“The engine of growth is the private sector. But when we say private sector, we tend to believe that the private sector is only (the) big businesses. The truth is that the private sector is really the micro, small and medium-sized enterprises. They drive growth,” he added.The DBJ, through IGNITE, enables Jamaican entrepreneurs, particularly MSMEs with innovative business ideas, to access grant funds to develop and commercialize their products and services.The bank provided funding of between $1 million and $4 million to 27 entrepreneurs under IGNITE’s 18-month pilot phase, for which $75 million was budgeted.Phase two was also launched at the ceremony.last_img read more