“I have a right to speak” – Deputy Mayor

first_imgParking meter debacleBy Ramona LuthiAs a controversy regarding the installation of parking meters in Georgetown continues to rage, a war ofDeputy Mayor Sherod Duncanwords seems to be emerging between Mayor Patricia Chase Green and her deputy, Sherod Duncan, who evidently have different views on the contract for the installation of the meters.Duncan had previously stated the contract for the parking meters was shared between two companies, with Smart City Solutions receiving 50 per cent and another company the remaining 50 per cent.However that was disputed by Director of Smart City Kamau Kush, who said his company has a contract for the installation of all the meters.Commenting on Duncan’s position, Chase Green on Tuesday made it clear that the Deputy Mayor was not speaking on behalf of the Council.However, on Wednesday, Duncan fired back at the Mayor, making it clear that he was elected to represent the views of his constituency.He said while she was correct that the Council has a Public Relations Officer who speaks on the Council’s behalf, he was reelected as a Councillor to represent all of Georgetown in keeping with the laws.“The day I was elected to the Council, I did not give up my right to speak on my own behalf or my right to speak on the behalf of all those residents of my constituency and municipality at large. And I most certainly speak for the officer of the Deputy Mayor of the municipality of Georgetown. I don’t believe the argument put forward, whether in a personal capacity or officially on behalf of Council, diminishes the potency and veracity of said arguments,” Duncan asserted.Duncan also brushed aside reports that there is a “rift” between him and the Mayor.He said that there are often clashes between persons with differing opinions.“This is what happens when people with differing views meet. There is a reason why there are 30 Councillors and not just a Town Clerk or just a Mayor and administrative staff. City Hall has to become a place of rigorous discussion, high ideals, and the cross fertilisation of ideas.”Both Duncan and Chase Greene were elected on APNU/AFC tickets; however, Duncan came from the AFC faction of the coalition, while Chase Green is from the APNU.last_img read more

Walk The Red Carpet With Will Smith And Help The Cesar Millan

first_imgIt does not get any bigger than walking the red carpet with superstar Will Smith AND what some call the royal family of Hollywood – or perhaps you’re just looking forward to M. Night Shyamalan’s new action-packed film, After Earth, starring none other than Will Smith and his son, Jaden Smith!Omaze.com is now offering Smith Family fans everywhere the opportunity to experience what it’s like to be the biggest star in Hollywood and walk the red carpet alongside Will Smith and his family. For this week only, you get the chance to fly out to New York City on May 29th (hotel and airfare included) to walk the red carpet with Hollywood’s favorite family and attend the premiere of their new movie, After Earth.Here’s how it’s possible – Omaze.com offers everyone the opportunity to engage in once-in-a-lifetime experiences with celebrities, athletes and the world’s greatest thinkers with the proceeds benefiting a social cause. By visiting Omaze.com, you’ll make a $5 donation to enter for your chance to meet the Smith Family, benefiting the The Cesar Millan Foundation, where every dollar you donate helps save the lives of shelter dogs.Now, what are you waiting for? Act fast because the contest closes THIS FRIDAY, May 17th, 2013.last_img read more

Riverdale Star in LateNight Car Crash After Working 16Hour Day on BC

first_imgK.J. Apa – David Livingston/Getty Images Login/Register With: Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisementcenter_img The crash has ignited a firestorm of protest on the set, which requires shoots that last until the early morning hours..The star of Riverdale was involved in a late-night car crash last week after a grueling 16-hour work day outside Vancouver, Canada, prompting the cast and crew of the hit CW show to demand better safety protections during production..K.J. Apa, 20, who plays Archie in the Warner Bros.-produced Archie Comics adaptation, apparently fell asleep driving the 45-minute trip home after midnight. He was taken to a local hospital for observation and later discharged without serious injuries. His car, however, didn’t fare as well. The passenger side was apparently destroyed after striking a light pole, and the vehicle was rendered inoperable..The crash has ignited a firestorm of protest on the Riverdale set, sources tell The Hollywood Reporter. The show routinely requires shoots that last until the early morning hours, and the cast and crew are not provided transportation to and from the set. Actor Cole Sprouse, who co-stars as Archie’s pal Jughead and is one of Apa’s close friends, had apparently planned to be in the car as well that night but changed plans at the last minute. Sprouse, a leader of sorts of the actors on the show, has asked that the Greg Berlanti-produced series provide transportation to cast members working late hours.. Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Prima donna protein doesnt work well in pairs

first_imgShareCONTACT: Jade BoydPHONE: 713-348-6778EMAIL: [email protected]‘Prima donna’ protein doesn’t work well in pairsRice University bioengineers measure pulling power of hitched pairs of protein motorsA new study by Rice University bioengineers finds that the workhorse proteins that move cargo inside living cells behave like prima donnas. The protein, called kinesin, is a two-legged molecular machine. Rice’s scientists invented tools that could measure the pulling power of kinesin both singly and in pairs, and they report this week in Biophysical Journal that kinesins don’t work well together — in part because they are so effective on their own.“Researchers have been investigating the mechanical properties of individual motor proteins for some time now, but this is the first time anyone’s been able to tie a defined number of molecular motors to a cargo and watch them work together,” said lead researcher Michael Diehl, assistant professor in bioengineering at Rice. “We know that more than one of these motors is attached to most cargoes, so understanding how they work together — or fail to — is a key to better understanding the intracellular transport system.”Cargoes inside cells are hitched to teams of motor proteins and hauled from place to place like horse-drawn wagons. Like stagecoaches or wagons, many cargoes are pulled by several horses. But unlike a wagon, cellular cargoes often also have multiple teams pulling in opposite directions.“Motor proteins move directionally,” Diehl said. “They either move toward the cell’s nucleus or they move away from the nucleus toward the periphery. Grouping different types of motors together allows cells to regulate cargo movement. But when there are multiple motors pulling antagonistically in opposite directions, what determines which group wins? What influences the balance? How do they cooperate or compete to get the right packages to the right place? Those are the kinds questions we’re trying to answer.”Diehl said intracellular transport has become an increasingly hot topic over the past decade, in part because researchers have found that breakdowns in the transport system are linked to neurodegenerative diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Huntington’s disease.One question Diehl and lead co-authors Kenneth Jamison and Jonathan Driver helped answer in the new study is how much pulling power a pair of kinesins could apply to a cargo compared with the amount applied by a single kinesin.The apparatus they created to study the problem was years in the making. Driver and Jamison, both graduate students, used strands of DNA to make a scaffold, a sort of molecular yoke that they could use to hitch a pair of kinesins to an experimental cargo. The cargo in their tests was a microscopic plastic bead. Using laser beams in an instrument called an optical trap, they attached teams of bead-pulling proteins to microtubule roadways.As the motors walked down the road, they pulled the bead away from the center of the optical trap. At the same time, the lasers in the trap exerted counterpressure in an effort to move the bead back to the center of the trap. Eventually, the light won out, forcing the motors to let go and the cargo to snap back to the middle of the beam. By measuring the precise movements of the bead during this reaction, Diehl’s team was able to determine exactly how much force a team of motors exerted on a bead.“Compared with other motors, kinesin is actually a pretty strong performer,” he said. “Single kinesin motor molecules can produce relatively large forces, and they rarely step in the wrong direction when walking along microtubules. This is remarkable behavior, considering kinesin is a molecular-scale machine that experiences significant thermal and chemical fluctuations.”Given how well they perform alone, it would be easy to assume that a group of kinesins would pull harder than a single kinesin. But Diehl points out that a team of kinesins can only harness the combined potential of both motors under certain circumstances.“Our analyses show that the two kinesins must stay in close proximity to one another to cooperate effectively,” he said. “Otherwise, one of the motors will tend to assume all of the applied force imposed on the cargo. Kinesin is relatively fast and efficient on its own, but they have trouble keeping up with one another when they are connected together.”Diehl said the group suspects that other classes of motor molecules, which are somewhat weaker than kinesin, may function better in groups. The team is carrying out follow-up experiments to see if that’s the case, and they are examining how such distinctions may play a role in regulating cargo movement in cells.Diehl’s research group, which is located in Rice’s new BioScience Research Collaborative, has spent years refining the tools used in the new study, and the work is paying off in numerous ways. Within the past four months, the group won an R01 grant from the National Institutes of Health worth more than $1.4 million, and Diehl also published a theoretical study of motor proteins with Rice chemist Anatoly Kolomeisky.Diehl’s research is funded by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation and the Welch Foundation. AddThislast_img read more