70th birthday and charity hack raise €2,740 for Raphoe’s Riding for the Disabled

first_imgTwo fantastic fundraisers have gathered €2,740 for the Raphoe and East Donegal branch of Riding for the Disabled.Mr Graham Bell recently held his 70th birthday party in aid of the volunteer group. He and his guests gathered €2,040 to make a very generous donation to his chosen charity.The money was gratefully received following a presentation by Mr & Mrs Bell with Adeline Temple, Suzanne Carroll, Jacqueline Witherow and Isobel Roulston from Raphoe and East Donegal RDAI. Mr & Mrs Bell with Adeline Temple, Suzanne Carroll, Jacqueline Witherow and Isobel Roulston from Raphoe and East Donegal RDAIAlso in June, the Tir Conaill Riding Club hosted a charity ride-out at Lough Eske to raise €700 for the group. The members took part in a 16km trek across the Bluestack Mountains before Mr Noel Cunningham and Harvey’s Point Hotel provided a beautiful lunch afterwards. Raphoe and East Donegal RDAI are very grateful to all concerned for their kind contribution  and generous hospitality.Tir Conaill Riding clubRaphoe’s Riding for the Disabled is dedicated to improving the lives of people with disabilities through the provision of horse riding and carriage driving. 70th birthday and charity hack raise €2,740 for Raphoe’s Riding for the Disabled was last modified: July 9th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Raphoe and East Donegal branch of Riding for the Disabledlast_img read more

Sustainable soil health

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest J.W. Lemons“A Nation that destroys its soil destroys itself.” – Franklin D. Roosevelt.We have learned some harsh lessons about how to treat our soil. While most of us are aware of the problems of the past, some agricultural operations in the world are not heeding those lessons.We all know that healthy soil is essential to feed the ever-increasing population of the world. However, many agriculture practices continue to damage and deplete our natural resources — of which soil ranks among the top. These practices have caused reductions in soil productivity due to soil loss through erosion and changes in the nutritional balances in soil. This has resulted in nutrient depletion and increased our dependence on synthetic fertilizers. Because of the low efficiency of many commercial fertilizers, we have over-applied many nutrients to maintain or increase crop production levels.Although these increased inputs have led to higher yields to meet the demand for food production, the over-application of nutrients has resulted in continuous environmental degradation of soil, water and vegetation resources. In some areas, organic matter levels are declining due to improper tillage and nutrient management, resulting in a depletion of naturally available nutrients in our soils. All of this leads to even higher chemical inputs, including the use of synthetic fertilizers.With continuous additions of chlorides, hydroxides, and other potentially harmful fertilizer byproducts, we have witnessed soil salinization and degradation of fresh water quality. Excess application of manures and acid-causing synthetic fertilizers has adversely affected soil structure, soil pH, and overall productivity of the soil. Over-application of synthetic fertilizers can also result in nutrient leaching into groundwater or off-site movement into surface waters.Nutrient pollution does major damage to our ecosystem. It can result in irreversible damage to aquatic life — both plant and animal. The damage extends from our fresh water sources to our coastal environments. Nutrient pollution can lead to coral reef degradation, and aquatic sea plant death. It can also be tied to the decline of aquatic biodiversity and algal blooms resulting in massive fish deaths. Groundwater and surface water contamination by nutrients has also been associated with a number of human health issues including reduced amounts and quality of drinking water (ex. Toledo, 2014), infant brain damage, methemoglobinemia (blue baby syndrome), and even death.Plants only absorb and utilize the nutrients they need at any given point during the growing season. Excess nutrients may remain in the soil; however, it is likely much of the excess will be leached through the soil or be tied up in the soil where it is unavailable. Two of these major nutrient pollutants are nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P). The main sources of N and P in groundwater are manure and synthetic fertilizers.Another result of our practices is the loss of natural biodiversity of soil organisms. Soil is a complex mixture of minerals, air, water and organic materials. We know our soil can benefit from bacteria, fungi, insects, and other organisms living underground. They help build soil tilth and increase land performance. Decomposition of the organic matter is essential to releasing nutrients to a plant. Included in organic matter are up to 2,400 pounds of fungi, 1,500 pounds of bacteria, 133 pounds of protozoa and hundreds of pounds of arthropods, algae, and even small mammals, per acre of soil. The pH and byproduct content of some commercial fertilizers can reduce populations of fungi, nematodes and protozoa. Additionally, many fertilizer (especially nitrogen) stabilizers have components that adversely affect soil microbes to accomplish that stability. Maintaining a healthy living environment for these organisms is critical for the sustainability of agriculture.AgroLiquid’s goal is to prosper the farmer while safeguarding the environment. Lower-grade raw materials can contain byproducts that are harmful to plants, soil, the environment and even human health. Using formulation technology that protects nutrients from loss to the environment and allows those nutrients to work with, instead of against, the biology of the soil to make them more usable by the crop.Intensive research, development and product testing have resulted in a full-line of nutrient products that don’t solely focus on N-P-K. As AgroLiquid Vice-President of Operations and Organizational Development, Nick Bancroft, said, “we use nutrients to make nutrients better.”For example, a phosphorus product needs more than just phosphorus to be effective.“It should not only contain phosphorous, it should contain nitrogen, it should contain potassium, and it should contain micronutrients.” Bancroft explains those nutrients work in harmony with phosphorous in the processes that phosphorous affect in the plant to make uptake, translocation, and utilization in the plant more efficient. This equates to more plant growth with less applied fertilizer.Again, using phosphorous as an example, one gallon of Pro-Germinator is significantly more efficient than conventional fertilizer sources when used at the recommended application rate. Less applied fertilizer means less leaching or off-target movement potential. The crop safety of Pro-Germinator allows it to be placed in the soil or on the plant, reducing the potential for pollution due to erosion. Many AgroLiquid products are also formulated to provide usable nutrients to the plant over the growing season, and not just for a short time after application, enabling the plant to utilize those available nutrients.AgroLiquid continues to advance our full line of fertilizers by considering the soil as a dynamic living organism. We strive for Responsible Nutrient Management to provide environmental stewardship, cost effective crop nutrition, and sustainability of agriculture for the future.Soil health helps determine sustainability in agriculture. A healthy soil will better perform to potential. By addressing the needs of the plant with efficient fertilizers and fertilizer placement, we can manage many of the adverse effects discussed here. The sustainability of agriculture is of utmost importance, and we are constantly and continuously researching, developing, testing and perfecting our products with the future in mind.last_img read more

Ohioan wins Ag Leader’s $25,000 giveaway

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Lora Howell from Danville won $25,000 worth of precision equipment for her farming operation from Ag Leader Technology.With the help of Evan Watson with Precision Agri Services, Inc., Howell created a video to share her story and participate in the national contest. The video of her farm to got her into the top three and Ag Leader selected the winner and announced the results in early August.“In case you don’t know us and our story, my dad passed away a few years back and when most people told my mom to downsize, she said, ‘I can do this,’” said Linsey Howell, Lora’s daughter. “Today, my mom and 14-year-old brother Justin, are successfully farming 500 acres and running livestock all while showing sheep competitively across the country!”She was the only Ohio contestant that made the top three and Ohio voters supported her until the July 20 deadline. Lora is a fourth generation farmer who manages the Farm Service Agency office out of Millersburg while maintaining 500 acre operation of corn, soybean, wheat, hay along with raising cattle, sheep, and goats.last_img read more

AFBF praises new Clean Water Rule

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The newly proposed Clean Water Rule would empower America’s farmers and ranchers to protect the nation’s water resources and provide much-needed regulatory clarity to guide those stewardship efforts, according to American Farm Bureau Federation President Zippy Duvall.Duvall recently spoke in Tennessee during an agricultural stakeholder meeting on the newly proposed Waters of the United States Rule. The event, hosted by the Tennessee Farm Bureau and kicked-off by Tennessee Farm Bureau President Jeff Aiken, included presentations by Acting Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler and Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, who provided farmers and ranchers additional details about the proposed rule.Duvall said farmers and ranchers are committed to protecting America’s waterways and drinking water, and the new Clean Water Rule will provide them the regulatory certainty they need to farm confidently with those natural resources in mind.“For more than five years we have advocated for a new water rule that protects clean water and provides clear rules for people and communities to follow,” Duvall said. “This proposal promises to do just that, by giving farmers and ranchers the clarity they need to farm their land while also ensuring the nation has clean water. Farmers should not have to hire an army of consultants and lawyers just to work their land.”During his comments, Aiken, a member of the AFBF Board, said it was an honor to host Wheeler and Perdue for the informational meeting about the new Clean Water Rule.“To echo Acting Administrator Wheeler, since we provide food for the table, we deserve a seat at the table,” Aiken said. “Farmers, homebuilders and businessmen from across Tennessee and surrounding states were excited at the announcement, which will provide clarity to farmers and allow them to continue to be good stewards of the land and environment.”More information about the newly proposed Clean Water Rule is posted at https://www.fb.org/cleanwaterrule.last_img read more