Aukmla Bridal Wedding Hair Pins, Matched my daughters tiara

first_imgBought for my daughters wedding wonderful.I appreciated the item, whilst i only gained 2, not three.Bought for my daughters wedding wonderful.Key specs for Aukmla Bridal Wedding Hair Pins for Women on Wedding and Party (Pack of 3):Handmade hair pins, You can change the shape by changing the bead (pack of 3)Hair accessories are Made of bead, Alloy Wire and Pins.Size: 4*2 Inches (10 * 5 cm)Headpieces for Wedding, Party, Evening and Casual.If you want to Refund, Please keep the drops and my products new. Two conditions that you cannot refund are listed as follow: 1. Product is used and damaged, 2. The drop of my product is damaged.Comments from buyers“Matched my daughters tiara”Lovely hair pins had plenty of opinions on them. Would absolutely advocate the seller and would purchase once again.Lovely hair pins had plenty of opinions on them. Would absolutely advocate the seller and would purchase once again.I purchased 3 sea of these hair pins for my three bridesmaids. Completely i am pleased with them but they arrived flat and you have to go the pearls and other gems all over to make it glance like the picture. 3 out of the nine appeared like the hair pins in the advised picture, the other individuals didn’t. So as an alternative of owning them all specific i’m likely to have to clump them together to make it appear like a much larger hear peice.Really great product & arrived on time.I appreciated the item, whilst i only gained 2, not three.Really great product & arrived on time.I purchased 3 sea of these hair pins for my three bridesmaids. Completely i am pleased with them but they arrived flat and you have to go the pearls and other gems all over to make it glance like the picture. 3 out of the nine appeared like the hair pins in the advised picture, the other individuals didn’t. So as an alternative of owning them all specific i’m likely to have to clump them together to make it appear like a much larger hear peice.last_img read more

Sue, Baby, Sue! Mapping the Legal Repercussions of the BP Spill

first_imgTags:#NYT#Real World#web During the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, we kept you current on how all parties were employing social media. We followed that up with tools to track the aftermath of the spill. Now, we would like to present you with a new way to watch the ripples that are still spreading from the Deepwater Horizon: lawsuits. The Environmental Law Institute‘s Ocean Program has launched a comprehensive and sophisticated database of every lawsuit related to the spill, replete with interactive maps. The count so far is 473 cases! Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting curt hopkins Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market “This database attempts to track the ongoing litigation so people can see the types of cases that have been triggered, when and where the parties have filed, and what cases have been closed or consolidated.”A user can search by type of case (environmental, labor, RICO, etc.), date of filing, or, by clicking the map, they can search by state or administrative area. An advanced search form allows the user to find specific docket numbers or all the cases filed in a specific court. Links from the search results lead the user to the PACER.GOV database (Public Access to Court Electronic Records). To go further, users must register with a credit card, since some actions are assessed a small fee. If data’s your bag, and you wish to order or explore it yourself, you can download an Excel spreadsheet of the entire database. In fact, it’s worth it just to survey the kinds of fall out that the spill has expressed. Lawsuits have been filed against Transocean, BP and Halliburton by seafood restaurants going out of business, Mexican states getting hit with crippling clean-up costs, personal injury suits, fisheries going under, fishermen going out of business and more. Related Posts last_img read more

High-Performance and Net-Zero Homes — Part 2

first_imgWelcome back to the rant! (This is an extended, multi-month rant, in case you were wondering.)Last month I introduced the “Change Toolkit,” a hierarchy of interventions with Mindset at the top (most effective type of intervention), followed by Processes, then Tools; Technologies (the perennial favorite) resides at the bottom – i.e., it is the least effective change lever in our toolkit for creating higher-performing homes. Homes with simple shapes are less expensive and perform betterIronically, simple building geometry has significant other benefits, not least of which is economy: simpler homes are less costly to build. Simpler homes also are much easier (and less expensive) to effectively insulate, air seal, and heat, and represent reduced likelihood of durability challenges such as moisture intrusion.Some of our most successful designers and builders of high-performance homes – unsurprisingly – embody these principles of simplicity and economy in their projects. The photos below show examples from South Mountain Company, ZETA Communities, and architect Steve Baczek. A design rantThis month’s installment in the rant is all about design. If you’re an architect, this is probably stuff you know, but that may not get your attention very often (or you’re diverted from it by those pesky clients).If you’re a building science geek, this is right up your alley – warm up your vocal chords for a great big Yeah! If you’re a builder, you may be ambivalent about it. We’ll see. RELATED ARTICLES High-Performance and Net-Zero Homes — Part 1High-Performance and Net-Zero Homes — Part 3High-Performance and Net-Zero Homes — Part 4High-Performance and Net-Zero Homes — Part 5 However, appeal more readily emanates from careful proportioning and quality materials, paired with simple, efficient building geometry. I highly recommend The Old Way of Seeing, by Jonathan Hale, in which he makes a compelling and scholarly case for this philosophy. Characteristics of traditional homesFirst I’d like to draw your attention to several types of what I’ll call “traditional homes,” shown in the image collage.These homes share some important characteristics. They are made:To fit the need (and no more)To be as comfortable as possible given available materials, ingenuity, and skillFrom materials at handUsing efficient geometriesWith low surface-to-volume ratiosThese are all excellent guidelines for the creation of high-performance and net-zero energy homes.center_img Taste, of course, is personal, and some may find these designs too simple. And yet there is a market for these homes, all of which are speculative projects. In our quest for high performance we should not lose sight of the fact that “simple” doesn’t mean “ugly” or “boring,” and it’s an enormously powerful design strategy with multiple performance dividends.The appeal of a home, for some, may rely on elaborate ornamentation, but for many others rests in a sense of comfort and welcoming or spare elegance, either of which may be successfully executed in a simple building volume. Characteristics of traditional homesEven so, much of the U.S. landscape is populated by homes that are absent these principles, such as those pictured below. While I fully understand that “curb appeal” is a dominant driver in home design, I believe that production homes in particular fall prey to design clichés, too often relying on surface ornamentation and geometric complexity in their quest for appeal. RELATED ARTICLE High-Performance and Net-Zero Homes — Part 1 last_img read more