There is still time to attend the All Bar Conference

first_imgThere is still time to attend the All Bar Conference January 1, 2003 Regular News There is still time to attend the All Bar Conferencecenter_img The 2003 All Bar Conference will review the Dignity in Law campaign and participants will discuss the need to increase public awareness about the role lawyers play in society.Participants also will earn up to eight hours of continuing legal education credits by attending the January 16 program in Miami.Invited bar leaders also will have an opportunity to gather tips on working with the news media, address the strengths and weaknesses of the Dignity in Law program, and determine what is “professional behavior” by viewing lawyers in popular film.“This conference is filled with useful, interesting and entertaining information,” said Alan Bookman, conference chair. “The Dignity in Law program has sparked a growing interest in Bar membership to share with the public the good works that lawyers and judges do every day. The dialogue that we will engage in will benefit current and future bar leaders.”The All Bar Conference will be held in conjunction with The Florida Bar’s Midyear meeting at the Hyatt Regency in Miami. The daylong conference begins with registration at 8 a.m. and ends at 5 p.m. with reports from four brainstorming groups that will critically analyze communication techniques with legislators, media, Bar members, and consumers.After opening remarks by Bar President Tod Aronovitz, attendees will have an opportunity to participate in a professionalism seminar titled, “The Good, The Bad and The Ugly: Lawyers and Popular Film.” Participants will determine what is professional behavior after viewing various film clips. Of the eight hours of general CLE credit, 1.5 hours of professionalism credit is included. A detailed report on the Dignity in Law campaign will follow the seminar.Dignity in Law is a public awareness campaign designed to promote dignity in the profession as well as emphasize the need for a fair and impartial judiciary by applying an intensive, consistent communications effort. The plan is designed to complement existing public relations efforts of the Bar.Lunch will include a discussion by some of Florida’s leading journalists on the merits of the Dignity in Law program and provide suggestions on how to improve the profession’s image. Panelists include Terri Somers of the South Florida Sun-Sentinel, Matthew Haggman of the Daily Business Review, David Porter of the Orlando Sentinel, Danae Jones of Florida Public Radio, and Bill Cotterell of the Tallahassee Democrat. The moderator will be Mike Vasilinda, owner of the Capitol News Service in Tallahassee.“Contrary to the high profile criminal cases that the public most often associates with the legal profession, most legal work goes largely unnoticed but is equally essential,” Aronovitz said. “From buying or selling a home to preparing a will, Floridians rely on attorneys to ensure that their rights and best interests are protected.”Christine Barney, CEO and managing partner of rbb Public Relations in Coral Gables, will explain what are the best methods to effectively communicate with the public and the media. Participants will learn how to determine what reporters are looking for, how to develop compelling soundbites, and the keys to controlling the interview.Aronovitz has made several appeals for voluntary bar participation through personal letters, e-mails, and notices in Bar publications. Invitations have been sent to Florida Bar leaders including The Florida Bar Board of Governors, The Florida Bar Young Lawyers Division Board, voluntary bar leaders, section and standing committee chairs, members of the board of The Florida Bar Foundation, and members of the judiciary.All participants are asked to register by fax or e-mail. You can download the conference program by visiting the Bar’s Web site, www.flabar.org. For more information contact Toyca Williams, at [email protected] or call (800) 342-8060, ext. 5764.last_img read more

​Nordic investors shun hedge funds in favour of risk premia strategies

first_imgNordic investors, including PKA, Ilmarinen and ATP, have praised the cost benefits and additional control over investment risk gained by shunning hedge funds in favour of strategies that emulate the asset class.Staffan Sevón of the €34bn Ilmarinen said that while the pensions mutual did have some exposure, it preferred to allocate to an absolute return portfolio viewed as an “internal” hedge fund. The mutual’s head of tactical asset allocation told the November issue of IPE there were significant benefits in managing the exposure in-house.“As well as the cost benefits, we can be more dynamic, and there are no gating problems,” he added. “Also, we know all exposures in real time, which means we can co-ordinate our internal hedge fund-type investments with the overall portfolio, avoiding duplication or counter-transactions.”Søren Grooss, portfolio manager at Denmark’s PKA, said the fund bypassed hedge funds, instead pursuing strategies that employ similar instruments such as leverage and derivatives.“This choice is partly to do with cost-efficiencies, but, the fact is, we believe we can do the things hedge funds are doing,” he said.“We are comfortable with those strategies, so there is no reason to pay a firm to package them.”ATP’s CIO Henrik Gade Jepsen echoed the concern over hedge fund costs, noting many had strategies in place that were essentially risk-factor investments that could be run more cost-efficiently in a different structure.He also cited the importance of keeping risk-factor investing in-house.“I would never embark on this strategy by outsourcing everything because you would be outsourcing a big chunk of your total risk,” he said.“And there are so many issues you need to make sure you understand.”Christer Franzén, CIO at the SEK18bn (€2bn) Ericsson pension fund, also warned fellow pension investors of the downside of investing in hedge funds.“I do not believe we should all expect to get positive alpha returns if we all invest in hedge funds,” he said.“By definition, there will be winners and losers, and there is a chance the size and knowledge of the investor may play a role in that.”For more on hedge funds and alternative strategies, see On The Record in the current IPElast_img read more